Tattoo Ink! You can’t create a tattoo without it … — July 14, 2015

Tattoo Ink! You can’t create a tattoo without it …

Tattoo Ink has been used for thousands of years.  Humans across cultures have used ink to create tattoos.   Each tattoo being designed for a purpose that would either commemorate life’s milestones, remember loved ones lost, a display of societal position, or even as a symbol of punishment. The methods used to make tattoo pigments were once primitive some would use crushed flowers, muddled dirt and water, or combined a variety of other natural ingredients which were then injected into their bodies.

As the art form of tattooing became more mainstream, the tattoo ink creation process became more fine-tuned. Modern tattoo ink designers were concerned with making products that were socially acceptable.  These inks needed to be organic, vegan-friendly, and non-toxic.  This would minimize health risks by being sterilized and tested for a broad spectrum of bacteria before being released.

Here at Ink Gypsy Tattoo Studio we take pride in the ink we use at our studio.  The following is a list of the ink manufactures that we currently use and their benefits:

Eternal Ink:

  • Eternal Ink is water-based, non-toxic and glycerol-free, which makes it suitable for vegans.
  • Eternal tattoo inks are pre-dispersed, so they flow smoothly and disperse evenly. Plus, they’re essentially ready to use right out of the bottle.
  • It’s manufactured by one of the oldest tattoo suppliers in the industry, so it’s backed by years of experience and has had more than 3 decades to be fine-tuned.
  • The variety of Eternal Ink colors, bottle sizes, and set options is nearly unparalleled.
  • Eternal Ink is manufactured in the U.S.

Mom’s Millennium Tattoo Ink:

  • Mom’s Inks are pre-dispersed to provide a fast, smooth flow.
  • They’re made from pure, uncut pigments.
  • Mom’s Millennium tattoo ink is made in the U.S.A.

Kuro Sumi Tattoo Ink:

  • Kuro Sumi inks are vegan-friendly and made from organic pigments.
  • Kuro Sumi tattoo ink’s intensely-bright colors are long-lasting.
  • The brand is endorsed by some of the best tattoo artists in the world.
Does getting a tattoo hurt? If so, How much does it hurt? — June 16, 2015

Does getting a tattoo hurt? If so, How much does it hurt?

I think everyone at some point has either asked or thought this question …  How much does it hurt?  Some might even avoid getting a tattoo just out of fear of how much pain they will feel.  Unfortunately,  there is not a direct answer to this question.  It totally depends on each persons pain threshold and tattoo placement.  Each area of the body shows pain differently.

Featured image

The first few minutes of getting your new tattoo is usually the worst and then you start to realize that it really isn’t as bad as you thought it was going to be.  Don’t get me wrong it is not smooth sailing from there, but you now know the answer to “How much does it hurt?”.  Just relax and if needed take breaks during your tattoo session so you can stretch.

Some have describe the pain to be like an annoying poke, paper cuts, blowtorch, a hot scratch, rats chewing, and sharp.  It helps to be fully informed on the tattoo process so that you will already have an idea of what is going to take place.  Make sure that you have eaten a healthy meal and drink plenty of water before your tattoo appointment, this will ensure that you will not feel week or want to pass out.

“How far does the tattoo needle and ink go into the skin?” — April 27, 2015

“How far does the tattoo needle and ink go into the skin?”

Featured image

So, “How far does the tattoo needle and ink go into the skin?” …. This question comes up quite often in conversations.  It is hard to explain, unless you can see the breakdown of all the different layers.  The above picture lays it out very clear and helps answer that question.

The skin has a total of 3 layers: Epidermis (composed of 5 sub-layers), Dermis, and Subcutaneous tissue.  The tattoo needle and ink should penetrate into the Dermis layer.  If the depth is too shallow, the tattoo ink will “bleed out”.  This is due to the fact that the Epidermis layer is constantly growing outwards which would take any ink that was deposited into that layer with it.  If the depth is too deep it will cause unnecessary pain and run the risk of infection.

The Dermis layer of skin is between 1mm and 2mm into the skin. The tattoo needles and machine are adjusted accordingly.  Once the tattoo needles have been set and adjusted the tip of the needle should not be sticking out anymore than 2mm and no less than 1mm.

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: